Notification: Please enable JavaScript and reload this page. Malts requires all users to enter their date of birth and country for verification of legal drinking age.
facebook-square pinterest-square twitter-square YouTube angle-down angle-left angle-right angle-up body caret-down caret-left caret-right caret-up casks character cross distillation Distillers-Edition Drops-of-Wisdom-close Drops-of-Wisdom-info Drops-of-Wisdom-orientation-arrow fermentation finish highlands islands left-arrow lowlands magnifying mashing minus nose palate Playhead plus process qq quote right-arrow scotland-outline scotland-shape Special-Release speyside star-half-empty star-half star-o star wechat weibo type-of-malt minus2 plus2

THE LINGO

A lexicon of terms from the world of whisky.

a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z

Find words begining with the letter

L

An unusually small pot still developed in 1955 by Alistair Cunningham which is used for batch distillation like a pot still but the level of reflux can be controlled in a similar manner to Coffey stills. It produces heavier, oilier spirit and is no longer in use for whisky distillation in Scotland.
Low Wines are the alcohol produced during the first distillation of the wash in the wash or low wines still. The name low comes from the low strength of about 22- 24% ABV. The low wines stills can usually be identified because of the small windows which help the still man to control the boiling process better.
The Lowlands of Scotland were always better suited to arable farming and, with the improvements in farming methods it became possible to grow and crop more cereals. Take into account the development of agricultural equipment like ploughs, the introduction of mechanical threshing mills and reapers, the easy availability of fuel, and the more sophisticated communications network, it is not surprising that Lowland distilling became large-scale and industrialised long before it happened in the Highlands. The Highlands of Scotland finish north of the Stirling plain and west of the rich farmland of Aberdeenshire. Back in the 1700s, the key to distilling in the Lowlands was always the availability of barley and the development of crop husbandry and harvesting. Distilling in the Highlands tended to be concentrated close to the area where there were abundant supplies of grain. It was mostly a part-time pursuit, dependent on agricultural production in a region where the main farming was based on livestock.

The Lowlands, however, were better suited to arable farming and, with the improvements in farming methods it became possible to grow and crop more cereals. Take into account the development of agricultural equipment like ploughs, the introduction of mechanical threshing mills and reapers, the easy availability of fuel, and the more sophisticated communications network, it is not surprising that Lowland distilling became large scale and industrialised long before it happened in the Highlands.

Glenkinchie is one of only a few Lowland distilleries currently in regular production. Its malt is typical of whisky produced in this region. Lowland malt whisky has always been lighter and drier in character than that from the Highlands, which is why it makes an excellent aperitif.

This is the pipe from the still where the spirit vapours are transported to be condensed back into liquid. The angle of the pipe is believed to influence the character of the whisky as it can promote or diminish the amount of contact between vapour and copper, which contributes to giving it a light or heavy body. Tall stills or stills with a lye pipe which angles upwards allow greater reflux, giving a lighter spirit. Stills with a smaller surface area or a downwards sloping lye pipe tend to produce a heavier spirit.