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Clynelish

Clynelish is an anglicised version of the Gaelic for green pasture

Clynelish is an anglicised version of the Gaelic for green pasture. And, though it’s a coastal whisky, this is fitting for a Scotch with sweet floral fragrances and verdant flavour notes. It’s a name with a long history, one that predates the distillery we know today, but which has adorned the labels of whisky bottles for two hundred years.

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Floral and crisp

Full of maritime qualities

You can almost taste the coastal flora in Clynelish Single Malt Scotch Whisky, with its crisp, medium- bodied, mustard-fresh style. Although you won’t find Islay’s powerful smokiness here, there is just a trace of it lingering. It’s said Clynelish whisky is closer to an Island style than other mainland malts, with a complex and fragrant nose and an agreeable long finish that leaves a lingering fresh-fruity flavour. Not a heavyweight, it is yet deliciously drinkable, and perfect as an aperitif.

The Clynelish distillery

The Clynelish distillery

The distillery we know today is the new Clynelish, and began production in 1969. It’s across the road from the old, original Clynelish, which was built by the Marquess of Stafford in 1819, providing a market for barley grown by his tenants. This closed in 1968 to make room for the larger, more modern neighbour… only to be reborn as Brora – a peated malt – which thrived until the early 80s. Brora, the Marquis and his tenants have all gone, but the barley that makes Clynelish is still malted in the Northern Highlands and water is still piped down from the Clynemilton Burn to the distillery.

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A highland malt praised for over a century
A floral whisky

Consistently good

Sutherland distilleries have always been few and far between. But whisky drinkers have always championed Clynelish over many more famous, and numerous, others. Today's whisky lovers consistently praise its unique combination of Highland and maritime qualities.