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The History Of The Singleton Of Glendullan

People and places don't just shape a Single Malt Scotch Whisky's flavour. They change the course of its future. Get a taste of how the whisky you love today came to be, by exploring The Singleton of Glendullan timeline.

1897

1897

Glendullan is founded by William Williams & Sons Ltd., blenders from Aberdeen, and is the last of seven distilleries to be built in Dufftown. It shares a private railway siding with nearby Mortlach.

1898

1898

The first consignment of barley arrives and distilling begins.

1919

1919

William Williams & Sons Ltd. merges with two Alexander & MacDonald Ltd. and Greenlees Brothers Ltd. to become Macdonald, Greenlees & Williams (Distillers) Ltd.

1926

1926

While they’re still deciding the final name of the company, it’s taken over by The Distillers Company Ltd.

1930

1930

Scottish Malt Distillers Ltd take over the distillery.

1940

1940

Like so many others, the distillery is closed during the war due to shortages.

1947

1947

Glendullan reopens, with most mechanical operations powered by water wheel.

1962

1962

New plant is installed in the mash house, tun room and stillhouse. The two stills, previously heated by coal furnace, are converted to internal steam heating.

1972

1972

The size of the site and the plentiful water from the Fiddich mean that, with rising demand at home and abroad, the construction an additional distillery, this time with six stills, is possible. Built on the field between the old distillery and staff housing, the distance between the two has been described as “A short one when the weather’s good, and a long one when it isn’t.”

1985

1985

The Old Glendullan buildings on the distillery site are decommissioned, though they remain in use as a workshop.