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The History Of Dailuaine

People and places don't just shape a Single Malt Scotch Whisky's flavour. They change the course of its future. Get a taste of how the whisky you love today came to be, with this brief Dailuaine timeline.

1853

1853

Founded by farmer William MacKenzie in a hollow by the Carron Burn. The name he chooses means ‘the green vale’ in Gaelic.

1863

1863

The Strathspey Railway arrives, opening Dailuaine to the world.

1865

1865

William MacKenzie dies and the distillery is let for a number of years to James Fleming.

1879

1879

William’s son Thomas becomes a partner in MacKenzie and Co.

1884

1884

Thomas Mackenzie sets out to modernise the distillery. Five years later it is one of the biggest in the highlands in terms of production.

1889

1889

It becomes the first distillery to be fitted with architect Charles Doig’s pagoda roof.

1891

1891

MacKenzie & Co converted to Dailuaine-Glenlivet Distillery Ltd.

1898

1898

The distillery merges again to form Dailuaine-Talisker Distilleries Ltd. Thomas MacKenzie had a substantial interest in Talisker distillery and so becomes chairman and MD of the new company.

1907

1907

A railway connection links the distillery with warehouses at Aberdeen and Imperial Distilleries and Carron, both of which MacKenzie part owned.

1915

1915

Thomas MacKenzie dies and the business is bought by a consortium of Buchanan, Dewar and John Walker and sons.

1917

1917

After a decade of recession and poor returns, fire destroys much of the distillery.

1920

1920

Production resumes, with power supplied by ingenious means, including waterwheels and steam engines.

1950

1950

Dailuaine is connected to the national grid.

1959

1959

A 12 month period of restoration work begins.

1960

1960

The distillery expands from four to six stills, and over the next five years the stillhouse is modernised.

1970

1970

The Strathspey railway is closed, and the much loved Puggies – steam engines which had served the distillery for decades – are given their last run.