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Knockando

In each bottle of Knockando whisky you will only ever find the produce of a single season, or year of production – a practice which continues to distinguish this delicate Speyside from almost all other single malts

In each bottle of Knockando whisky you will only ever find the produce of a single season, or year of production – a practice which continues to distinguish this delicate Speyside from almost all other single malts.

Discover
An especially delicate, fruity Speysider

Light and occasionally intense

Only natural ingredients are used in the production of Knockando: malted barley, yeast and crystal clear spring water from the Cardnach spring, which lies in the hills above the distillery. Together, with time, they create a delicate whisky with a distinctive fresh almond note in its younger versions that gains weight and depth of flavour over the years. No doubt why Knockando whisky reviews are consistently good.

The Knockando distillery

The Knockando distillery

Knockando stands proudly overlooking the river Spey. The product of this picturesque distillery has a Speyside character, through and through – being light, floral and delicate.

View History

From an isolated bend on the River Spey
A delicate character

Picture-perfect Malt

Built by John Thompson in 1898, the Knockando distillery sits next to the river Spey in the village of the same name. Derived from the Gaelic ‘Cnoc-an-dhu’ meaning ‘little black hill’, the distillery was founded during the Victorian whisky boom in 1898, but fell foul of dodgy distributors – closing in 1899 after just a year of production. W & A Gilbey soon took over, marking a change of fortunes for the distillery and for lovers of whisky everywhere.