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The History Of Teaninich

People and places don't just shape a Single Malt Scotch Whisky's flavour. They change the course of its future. Get a taste of how the whisky you love today came to be, with this brief Teaninich timeline.

1817

1817

Captain Hugh Munro, descendant of an ancient family and owner of the estate, builds a distillery on his estate.

1830

1830

After 13 years battling the competition of illicit distilleries for buying grain and selling whisky, Teaninich’s production is up 30-fold. Around this time, Hugh sells the estate as a going concern to his younger brother Lieutenant General John Munro.

1850

1850

John Munro, often on active service in India, decides to lease the distillery to Robert Pattinson from Leith, and later John McGilchrist Ross.

1887

1887

Writer Alfred Barnard describes Teaninich as the only distillery north of Inverness to be lit by electricity, or fitted with telephones.

1895

1895

Another John Munro, a spirit merchant, and Robert Innes Cameron, a giant of the whisky world at the time, take over tenancy.

1898

1898

Roderick Kemp sells his share of Talisker, using the money to buy Macallan.

1904

1904

Robert Innes Cameron becomes the sole proprietor of Teaninich, and operates it until his death in 1932.

1933

1933

The trustees sell to Scottish Malt Distillers Company Limited.

1939

1939

Like many at the time, Teaninich closes due to barley shortages until 1946, when two stills were removed.

1962

1962

Electricity replaces steam and water power at the stillhouse.

1970

1970

The property is modernised again, with a new building next to the old complex, housing six brand new stills.

1973

1973

The milling, mashing and fermentation installations of the old part of the distillery are rebuilt. The distillery now covers some 20 acres, with eight houses for workers.

1984

1984

The old distillery buildings close.

1975

1975

Another addition, this time to process cattle feed from the distillery’s waste.

1985

1985

The newer stills are also shut down.

1991

1991

Teaninich is revived, though the old buildings remained mothballed.

1999

1999

The older buildings are finally decommissioned.